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Table 3 Some examples of salt-tolerant biomass-degrading enzymes and their properties

From: Facing the challenge of sustainable bioenergy production: Could halophytes be part of the solution?

Enzyme Species and strain Salt tolerance Optimum temperature (°C) Reference
Halophilic species
  Cellulase Halomonas sp. S66-4 5 M NaCl 45 [122]
  Cellulase Haloarcula sp. LLSG7 30% (w/v) NaCl 50 [157]
  Cellulase Haloarcula sp. G10 27.5% (w/v) NaCl 60 [158]
  Xylanase Uncharacterized strain CL8 5 M NaCl 60 [159]
  Xylanase Uncharacterized strain CL8 5 M NaCl 65 [159]
  Xylanase Halorhabdus utahensis 27%–30% (w/v) NaCl 55 and 70a [160]
Salt-tolerant species
  Cellulase Aspergillus terreus UniMAP AA-6 7.7% (w/v) NaCl 30 [161]
  Cellulase Marinobacter sp. MSI032 2% (w/v) NaCl 27–35 [162]
  Xylanase Bacillus sp. NTU-06 5% (w/v) NaCl 40 [163, 164]
  Cellulase Stachybotrys microspora 2.56 M NaCl 50 [123]
  Cellulase Bacillus sp. BG-CS10 2.5 M NaCl, 3 M KCl 55 [125]
  Cellulase Brine shrimp (Artemia salina) 600 mM NaCl 55 [164]
  Cellulase Thalassobacillus sp. LY18 10% (w/v) NaCl 60 [165]
  Cellulase Bacillus agaradhaerens 2 M NaCl, 0.8 M KCl 60 °C [166]
  Cellulase Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 3 M NaCl, 4 M KCl 75–80 [124]
  1. aTwo independent optima of activity were determined